SPSFC Book Review: “The Nothing Within” by Andy Giesler

I’m a judge for the Self-Published Science Fiction Contest, and while the semi-finalists are out, I’ve been circling back and reading through books from other groups that looked intriguing.

The Nothing Within by Andy Giesler

A plague knocked out most of the human population centuries ago. Now, Root lives in a society with rigid traditions and structures that they believe is the only way to survive. Meanwhile, readers dive into journal entries and a few other tastes of the past to help outline what’s happening in the novel’s present.

I wouldn’t call The Nothing Within kaleidoscopic in its storytelling, though it borrows some from that style. Instead, Root’s story grounds the other writings that are contained in the novel. And Root’s story is just phenomenally told. The narrative voice that Giesler gives Root makes everything feel not just interesting but also utterly believable and real. It’s a totally convincing narrative voice that makes reading the book feel like stepping into someone else’s head at times.

The world Giesler created is interesting, but a bit more generic than the narrative voice. It’s got some of the hallmarks of dystopia/post-apocalyptic to it, but Giesler gives enough twists to keep it engaging all the way through. The most important thing is that it’s understandable how society developed as it did once you read more of the story.

The real draw here, though, is following Root’s story as she comes of age and gets old, letting readers into the mind of someone whose life mattered in a society that needed some change. And Giesler absolutely nails that, making this a must-read for fans of the subgenre.

The Nothing Within is a great read for those who enjoy different takes on post-apocalyptic fiction. Recommended.

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Links

The Self-Published Science Fiction Contest (SPSFC) Hub– Check out all of my posts related to the SPSFC here!

Science Fiction Hub– I have scores of reviews of Hugo nominees, Vintage Sci-Fi, modern sci-fi, TV series, and more! Check out my science fiction related writings here.

Be sure to follow me on Twitter for discussion of posts, links to other pages of interest, random talk about theology/philosophy/apologetics/movies/scifi/sports and more!

SDG.

Star Wars Expanded Universe Read-Through: “X-Wing: Wraith Squadron” by Aaron Allston

I’m on a quest to re-read all of my favorite (or least favorite that I kept for whatever reason) Star Wars novels in the Expanded Universe and beyond. Come along for the ride and check out my Star Wars Hub for more. There will be SPOILERS for the book discussed.

X-Wing: Wraith Squadron by Aaron Allston

Wraith Squadron marks a departure for the series as Aaron Allston takes over for Michael A. Stackpole. Wedge has moved to a different task. Instead of leading the elite-of-the-elite in a squadron to be commando-pilots, he is taking on the castoffs and problem children of other squadrons, whipping them into shape, and making them into, er, commando-pilots.

The idea is a fine one, and it gives the series a slew of new faces. The best part of the book is all the side characters getting so much development. I was blown away when a certain event happened, showing characters in this series are actually vulnerable. It was quite well done, especially the aftermath.

The plot is a good thread, as an Imperial Warlord continues to meddle with Wedge’s affairs. There are plenty of well-written space battles (caveat being you have to accept the complete absurdity of Star Wars space battles–no; physics and common sense need not apply) to be had. What bogs the story down is some of the more commando parts in which the pilots are out of their various spaceships. There are many scenes that are apparently supposed to be a kind of spy-action type thing happening, but instead just feel slow. They’re throwaway scenes as far as the plot goes, too. One can almost feel Allston waiting to get pilots back into their fighters.

Wraith Squadron is another good read in an excellent series. I continue to enjoy my first-ever read through of this series, and I’m glad I’ve been able to circle back and read them at last.

The Good

+Great space battles
+A villain that at least has some mystery to how he acts
+Many side characters introduced
+Actual consequences for characters in the book

The Bad

-Gets bogged down in action scenes that aren’t in space
-A bit too much standing around talking with each other

Cover Score: 5/10 – They basically just mashed as many fighters on the cover as they could

Grade [measured against my super objective* Star Wars enjoyment factor]: B Allston takes over the series with hardly a hiccup.

*Not super objective and in fact wholly based on my feeling at the time of this review. Not measured against any other sci-fi works or really any other literature. This score is purely because I like giving scores to things.

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Links

Star Wars Hub– All of my Star Wars-related posts can be found here. These include posts about more expanded universe books, the movies, and new canon novels.

J.W. Wartick- Always Have a Reason– Check out my “main site” which talks about philosophy of religion, theology, and Christian apologetics (among other random topics). I love science fiction so that comes up integrated with theology fairly frequently as well. I’d love to have you follow there, too!

Be sure to follow me on Twitter for discussion of posts, links to other pages of interest, random talk about theology/philosophy/apologetics/movies/scifi/sports and more!

There are other posts on science fiction books to be found! Read them here.

SDG.

SPSFC2 First Impressions: “Mercury’s Shadow,” “Ever the Hero,” and “A Hardness of Minds”

The Self-Published Science Fiction Contest (“SPACEFIC”) is underway, and my group is going through one of my favorite parts of the contest: sorting through a slush pile. Basically, we get a stack of books and need to sample them all to narrow down our selections for quarter- and semi-finalists. Here, I’ll be going over my first impressions of some of these books. Please note my “Yes,” “No,” or “Maybe” vote is only indicative of my opinion and may not reflect the opinion of our whole group. Since we advance books as a group, it’s possible a “Yes” from me may end up a “No” overall and vice versa. Let me know what you think of the books in the comments!

Mercury’s Shadow by PJ Garcin

Humanity struggles as the ultra-rich determine the future, and the way it happens here is when one corporate autocrat decides to basically dyson sphere the sun with micro-robots. The twists so far have been somewhat predictable, and the contrast between the down-on-her-luck MC and the others is an expected trope. But tropes are tropes for a reason, and here the characters are done quite well with the drama building steadily through the first 20%. It has a fun YA feel to it that I find extremely endearing. It’s a “yes” because I want to read more.

Ever the Hero by Darby Harn

I read this one from another group’s slush pile last year because I love superhero stories. Kit finds an alien artifact as she’s scavenging through the ruins of her city for something to sell. When she goes to swap it, she gets caught up in the tragic story of Valene, a super-powered woman who can hear everything, everywhere, all the time. Her suffering from this power is great, and Kit finds herself trying to manipulate the artifact to help the ailing super. The plot has the “wrong side of the tracks” vibe with Kit, while also taking into account race, economic disparity, and more, wrapping all of it up into a compelling superhero story.

This one’s a yes. It’s a great read, which I recommend!

A Hardness of Minds by Eric Kay

I have feelings about this one. The first chapter of the book didn’t really grab me. It felt kind of like a generic near-future in which a character is trying to get a space expedition going. But then I discovered the chapters alternate (so far) between that perspective and that of aliens living under the ice of Europa. The second, alien perspective is fascinating, as characters struggle with the theological questions of what would happen if the ice were breached (would null space take over!?) and fighting against supposed scientific progress. It was a fascinating perspective even if the aliens didn’t quite feel alien enough. When I sit back and think about whether to mark books as “yes” or “no” (or hedge with “maybe”) the question I ask is mostly do I personally want to read more of this book? For me, the alien perspective made A Hardness of Minds a Yes.

Conclusion

Yeah… apparently I’m loving our slush pile yet again. Very few “no’s” showing up so far, and even they have some good qualities to them. I’m gonna either have to rely on my fellow group members to have their votes decide or we’re going to have a lot of reorganizing/ranked choice voting to figure out our quarterfinalists! But this is a great problem to have. It shows the breadth and depth of the indie sci-fi field, which is exactly what we want!

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Links

The Self-Published Science Fiction Contest (SPSFC) Hub– Check out all of my posts related to the SPSFC here!

Be sure to follow me on Twitter for discussion of posts, links to other pages of interest, random talk about theology/philosophy/apologetics/movies/scifi/sports and more!

SDG.

“Hall of Bones” by Tim Hardie- A SPFBO7 Finalist Review

I’m a judge for the first-ever SPSFC (Self Published Science Fiction Contest), but couldn’t help noticing the parallel SPFBO (Self Published Fantasy Blog-Off) contest happening. I always love finding some new indie authors and books, so I decided to read through the finalists of that contest and review them on my site. As always, let me know your own thoughts in the comments.

Hall of Bones by Tim Hardie

Hall of Bones follows the epic story of Rothgar’s coming of age as his clan suffers from brutal attacks from its rival. That rival is powered by dark magic and ancient evil, and the novel reads as a great first entry in a long saga.

The story starts off as a kind of hero’s journey, complete with love interests, numerous rivals, and familial tension. The plot doesn’t stay wholly trope-y, though, as things go off the rails with both political drama among the clans and a greater evil threat to the whole way of life of all those within the world.

It’s easy to get lost in Rothgar’s narrative, in ways both good and bad. The cacophony of Norse-inspired names and places can become overwhelming, even from the first pages of the book as numerous characters are thrown at the reader on every page. On the flip side, the wealth of characters and detail makes the world feel full and robust. I did occasionally feel like I needed a printed off dramatis personae sheet, though.

When the narrative works, it works well. Readers will be drawn into the alcohol-soaked halls filled with revels, the language the people utter, and the dramatic buildup of conflict throughout the story. While the narrative occasionally flounders in the midst of the sea of characters and names that can make even the most focused brain feel a bit muddled. Rothgar’s own destiny is questioned throughout the novel, as he struggles to figure out what the dark dreams he has mean, and what his abilities entail.

Hall of Bones reads like a Viking epic, complete with all the positives and negatives that might engender. Readers wanting to dive into a richly realized fantasy world with a darker turn of magic should check it out.

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Links

Fantasy Hub– My hub for links to posts about fantasy works on this site. Hugo and other Award nominees, vintage fantasy, indie books, and more!

Science Fiction Hub– I have scores of reviews of Hugo nominees, Vintage Sci-Fi, modern sci-fi, TV series, and more! Check out my science fiction related writings here.

Be sure to follow me on Twitter for discussion of posts, links to other pages of interest, random talk about theology/philosophy/apologetics/movies/scifi/sports and more!

SDG.

SPSFC2 First Impressions: “Tracker220,” “Qubit,” and “Along the Perimeter”

The Self-Published Science Fiction Contest (“SPACEFIC”) is underway, and my group is going through one of my favorite parts of the contest: sorting through a slush pile. Basically, we get a stack of books and need to sample them all to narrow down our selections for quarter- and semi-finalists. Here, I’ll be going over my first impressions of some of these books. Please note my “Yes,” “No,” or “Maybe” vote is only indicative of my opinion and may not reflect the opinion of our whole group. Since we advance books as a group, it’s possible a “Yes” from me may end up a “No” overall and vice versa. Let me know what you think of the books in the comments!

Tracker220 by Jamie Krakover

People have implanted devices that let them basically be walking repositories of information and neural networks connected with others. But Kaya questions the validity of the system as it prevents her family from Shabbat observance in the way they’d prefer. Moreover, her Tracker seems to have a glitch that lets her access anyone and anything. This sets her on the run from the authorities and throws her in with some members of a budding resistance community. The novel reads as a YA-aimed dystopia, and since that’s right in my alley, I had a blast reading and sampling this one. It’s a “yes” from me.

Qubit by Finn Mack

Quantum computers are the goal in this tightly paced (so far) techno-thriller by Finn Mack. A few different viewpoints offer ratcheting tension throughout the early stages of the book, and I was easily sold on the hard sci-fi/techno-thriller mashup. Some mathematics and made up science accompany some real science and mafia-esque action behind the scenes. I’m enjoying my time with Qubit and plan to finish it even if it doesn’t advance from our group. “Yes” from me, now excuse me while I keep reading.

Along the Perimeter by Steven Healt

A young man lives “along the perimeter” of a shield that keeps out a malevolent gas and raiders that threaten the last vestiges of humanity. An alien race paints itself as benevolent saviors of humanity–but are they, really? This atmospheric first entry in what’s to be a lengthy science fantasy epic had me thinking of some of my favorite epic fantasy novels for its world-building. The world really is the star of the novel, as layers are peeled back in interesting ways throughout. I actually read this book last SPSFC on a whim from another group’s slush pile, so I have a full review and even an author interview! As one might guess, this is a “Yes.”

Conclusion

One might notice I have 3 “yes” votes in this batch, and going with my previous two batches, I’m already at 6 “yes” votes. Maybe I say “yes” too easily, but the good news (or bad news) is that if we have too many “yes” votes we just do a ranked choice and the top votes move on! As always, I’d love to read your thoughts on these books. Let me know what you think in the comments.

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Links

The Self-Published Science Fiction Contest (SPSFC) Hub– Check out all of my posts related to the SPSFC here!

Be sure to follow me on Twitter for discussion of posts, links to other pages of interest, random talk about theology/philosophy/apologetics/movies/scifi/sports and more!

SDG.

“ARvekt” by Craig Lea Gordon – An SPSFC Review

As a judge for the Self-Published Science Fiction Contest (SPSFC), I’m reading and reviewing all of the semi-finalists! Check out my SPSFC Hub for all my posts and reviews for the contest.

ARvekt by Craig Lea Gordon

Tannis Ord was an assassin fighting against brain hackers, but her mind suffered major damage. Malevolent AIs, corporate espionage, and hacking threaten Ord as she tries to figure out what’s happening.

As we open ARvekt, it’s unclear what’s reality and what is artificial. This is especially clear as we watch one character’s head get blown apart–only to discover it was Artificial Reality imposing on the real world. The lines between reality and non-reality are blurred intentionally throughout the book. Gordon does well using this to hide some plot twists longer than might otherwise have been possible.

The increasing threat of AI and brain hackers is interspersed with scenes about politicking about the same, and I admit the latter scenes began to feel sluggish especially in comparison to other action packed setups. Ord’s mind added another layer of unreality to events as readers have to try to figure out if it’s her own psychosis leading to observations or what she’s really–or not really?–seeing.

All these layers at times make the book a bit hard to follow. Seasoned Cyberpunk fans, though, I suspect will love strapping and and jumping down this rabbit hole to figure out where it might come out. What makes the book especially interesting, though, is the fusion of AR/AI/and our reality in ways that seem impossible now but aren’t implausible. What would and will happen as VR/AR becomes stronger and more people are integrated into it?

ARvekt is a stylish cyberpunk thriller that is perhaps too twisty. Recommended for fans of the subgenre and those with an interest in AI and/or Artificial Reality.

All links to Amazon are Affiliates

Links

The Self-Published Science Fiction Contest (SPSFC) Hub– Check out all of my posts related to the SPSFC here!

Science Fiction Hub– I have scores of reviews of Hugo nominees, Vintage Sci-Fi, modern sci-fi, TV series, and more! Check out my science fiction related writings here.

Be sure to follow me on Twitter for discussion of posts, links to other pages of interest, random talk about theology/philosophy/apologetics/movies/scifi/sports and more!

SDG.

“Legend of the Galactic Heroes: Volume 1- Dawn” by Yoshiki Tanaka

The Legend of Galactic Heroes is a… well, legendary anime series. What far fewer people have experienced is the novels upon which it is based. I’m probably something of an outlier here–having only read some of the books while not having seen the anime. I wanted to write about the series of novels to encourage others to read them.

Dawn is the first novel in the 10-book series by Yoshiki Tanaka. The story starts off with a lengthy description of the state of the world that is reminiscent of Olaf Stapledon in scale. Grand history is recounted with only the smallest amount of details, skipping along in time as readers are introduced to the primary antagonists in the story to come.

The story itself, once it starts, primarily follows the military exploits of Reinhard von Lohengramm and Yang Wen-Li, commanders on opposite sides of the conflict who are brilliant tacticians. Readers are thrown into the story with massive combat that occurs on comically massive scale. Thousands upon thousands of ships are thrown into battle against each other, sometimes with millions of combatants resulting in hundreds of thousands of losses on one side or the other (or both). People who insist on realism in science fiction should probably steer clear. This isn’t aiming for realism. It’s aiming for drama and big ships blowing up other big ships on a grand scale.

It’s easy to see while reading the novel how it was moved almost seamlessly into an anime. I already talked about the ridiculously massive battles that make for great anime-like scenes. The characters are another aspect of this–brooding in their own thoughts at times while being overly brusque or emotional at others. It’s all high drama all the time. If you’re into that sort of thing–and I very much am–this is right up your alley. Do you like anime? Ever wish you could experience a big military anime in book form? This is absolutely the series for you.

On the negative side (for those who don’t see absurd scales and some behavior as a negative), the treatment of women throughout the first couple novels (still working my way though the series) is… not great. They’re largely either relegated to the sidelines or only exist as foils for the men in the story. While it could be dismissed as reflective of a somewhat conservative approach to society from Tanaka, I found it inexcusable to have so little attention given to women characters.

The grand scale of strategy is evident throughout the series. Huge battles are fought for various military objectives, and Tanaka does a great job showing why, for example, a single space station could become hugely important. Again, this requires some suspension of disbelief for the sake of plot, but I found it satisfying time and again to see the military action play out in traceable, objective-based fashion even in space.

Dawn is a superb read for those who want the grand scale that so rarely is visited in military sci-fi. The battles and world are almost comedically big, and that makes it a unique read in the subgenre. I recommend it to fans looking for something different.

All Links to Amazon are Affiliates

Links

Science Fiction Hub– I have scores of reviews of Hugo nominees, Vintage Sci-Fi, modern sci-fi, TV series, and more! Check out my science fiction related writings here.

Be sure to follow me on Twitter for discussion of posts, links to other pages of interest, random talk about theology/philosophy/apologetics/movies/scifi/sports and more!

SDG.

SPSFC2 First Impressions: “Ghosts of Tomorrow,” “All is Silence,” and “Unplugged”

The Self-Published Science Fiction Contest (“SPACEFIC”) is underway, and my group is going through one of my favorite parts of the contest: sorting through a slush pile. Basically, we get a stack of books and need to sample them all to narrow down our selections for quarter- and semi-finalists. Here, I’ll be going over my first impressions of some of these books. Please note my “Yes,” “No,” or “Maybe” vote is only indicative of my opinion and may not reflect the opinion of our whole group. Since we advance books as a group, it’s possible a “Yes” from me may end up a “No” overall and vice versa. Let me know what you think of the books in the comments!

Ghosts of Tomorrow by Michael R. Fletcher

Okay, fair warning, this one’s graphically violent. That tends to be off-putting for me, especially when it involves children, as it does at times in this novel. But the violence fits the narrative and doesn’t ever seem pointless. And that narrative is fascinating, bouncing between a few viewpoints between a corporate bureaucrat trying to extend life no matter the cost and other, more action-packed viewpoints that center around the consequences of unfettered capital and the lust for endless life. I’m not really into grimdark/huge amounts of violence, but the characters in this one sucked me in. The plot moves quickly, too, making each scene read as a pivotal piece. The intricate, well-paced plot has me slotting this as a “yes.”

All is Silence by Robert L. Slater

A near-future post-apocalypse after a worldwide plague wipes out a huge percentage of the population. When Lizzie connects with a few people from her life who remain alive, some embark on a quest to survive. As I sampled this, I kept thinking I wanted something more from it to push it over the edge to be of more interest. It is well-written and interesting, but feels somewhat generic to me. The budding love interest plot has some moments that I didn’t enjoy, such as when one character specifically instructs the other not to touch/kiss/etc. and then that character still kisses the other on the cheek when they’re asleep. I know it’s a little thing, but if the plot is going in the direction of a love interest–as it potentially seems to be–I don’t like the notion of it starting off that way. The world is interesting–feeling just like our own sans billions of people–and I was enjoying seeing where Lizzie might take herself. The story hits a bit close to home, of course, with a global pandemic. But shades of more going on (like zombies… maybe?) show up in the background. It’s well written, but reads somewhat generically to me. At this stage I’m leaning “no” on this one.

Unplugged by J.B. Taylor

A dystopic surveillance state with shades of religious exploitation and a detective trying to avoid it all and break out? There are shades of “The Matrix” and “Equilibrium” here, and within the first few percent I was sold on the premise. I am interested to see where the plot goes, and I love the shades of religious language found for the dystopic world as well. It’s got the hallmarks of a great dystopia, and I’m very engaged in finding out what’s happening next. It’s a “yes.”

Conclusion

What did you think of these books? Which sound interesting to you? Let me know in the comments, and be sure to follow the blog for more SPSFC content!

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Links

The Self-Published Science Fiction Contest (SPSFC) Hub– Check out all of my posts related to the SPSFC here!

Be sure to follow me on Twitter for discussion of posts, links to other pages of interest, random talk about theology/philosophy/apologetics/movies/scifi/sports and more!

SDG.

“Burn Red Skies” by Kerstin Espinosa Rosero- An SPFBO7 Finalist review

I’m a judge for the Self-Published Science Fiction Contest who’s reading all the finalists for the Self-Published Fantasy Blog Off! I’ll have reviews for every finalist, and ultimately choose my own winner!

Burn Red Skies by Kerstin Espinosa Rosero

Burn Red Skies has a bunch of stuff for fantasy fans. It feels, honestly, a bit like a fantasy video game with how many elements are piled on with carefree abandon. There are dragons, summoners, a genocide-in-progress, rifts, flying ships, armies, and more. There are a couple ways for authors to get readers’ legs under them. The way I enjoy the least is when you get thrown into a world with a lot going on and very, very little context. That doesn’t–quite–happen here, but there are quite a few info dumps near the beginning before the plot gets its legs under it.

The worldbuilding eventually gets more dynamic as the novel progresses, and characters’ stories get looped together and entangled in intricate ways. I think this is the strength of the novel.

What didn’t work for me is the way that genocide seems to be kind of a ho hum issue. We’re supposed to, I think, have some sympathy for those carrying out the Purge. There is some nuance built in, but it is never expanded upon or given the depth that it needed as a theme. The people who are supposed to be the bad guys–maybe?–are more sympathetic than they ought to be in my opinion based on the awful acts they’re doing. I also had difficulty getting into the story at the beginning due to the sheer amount of info dump happening all at once. It felt like I had to figure out how the world worked before I could really start to read about and enjoy it.

Burn Red Skies is a fantasy epic that readers who enjoy lots of plot elements can enjoy. It certainly has enough going on to build into a great epic, and there’s more coming.

All links to Amazon are affiliates.

Links

Fantasy Hub– My hub for links to posts about fantasy works on this site. Hugo and other Award nominees, vintage fantasy, indie books, and more!

Science Fiction Hub– I have scores of reviews of Hugo nominees, Vintage Sci-Fi, modern sci-fi, TV series, and more! Check out my science fiction related writings here.

Be sure to follow me on Twitter for discussion of posts, links to other pages of interest, random talk about theology/philosophy/apologetics/movies/scifi/sports and more!

SDG.

Reading the Horus Heresy, Book 21: “Fear to Tread” by James Swallow

I know I’m late to the party, but I finally decided to start reading the “Horus Heresy,” a huge series of novels set in the universe of Warhammer 40,000 (though it is set much earlier than the year 40,000). I thought it would be awesome to blog the series as I go. With more than 50 novels and many, many short stories, there will be a lot of posts in this series (I doubt I’ll get to all the short stories). I’m reading the series in publication order unless otherwise noted. There will be SPOILERS from the books discussed as well as previous books in the series. Please DO NOT SPOIL later books in the series.

Fear to Tread by James Swallow

I’ll admit it, I thought the previous books in this series about the any “Angels” were boring slogs. Descent of Angels is about the Dark Angels and was too long to carry its miniscule plot thread. Fallen Angels didn’t have enough action to sustain its political machinations. Fear to Tread, about the Blood Angels, is, instead, totally compelling front-to-back.

The story reveals quite a bit of background about the Blood Angels, including their apparent nature where they fall into a kind of raging bloodlust that cannot be quenched and leads to atrocities. Sanguinius has been keeping the nature of his Legion secret, ultimately (and fatefully) revealing it to Horus. This, of course, sets up a major movement in the Heresy as Horus sends the Blood Angels on a quest to allegedly find the cure. Instead, they find forces of Chaos and Xenos in zounds.

The action here is pretty awesome. I’ve said multiple times in my reviews of this series that I’m not only about action. However, the point of having space marines is, presumably, to have them fight stuff. So the political machinations behind the scenes should set up some big battles, and Swallow certainly delivers here. The xenos are interesting, too, which doesn’t always happen. The book also reads like it has bigger events going on beneath the surface, and that the events that take place herein are important in the grander scheme of things. It genuinely feels like its advancing the story in a meaningful way.

Fear to Tread is another great entry in a series that continues to be compelling despite its epic length. I recommend it.

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Links

Horus Heresy and Warhammer/40K Hub– Links to all of my Warhammer-related reviews and writings, including those on the Horus Heresy, 40K, and Warhammer Fantasy (pending) can be found here.

J.W. Wartick- Always Have a Reason– Check out my “main site” which talks about philosophy of religion, theology, and Christian apologetics (among other random topics). I love science fiction so that comes up integrated with theology fairly frequently as well. I’d love to have you follow there, too!

Be sure to follow me on Twitter for discussion of posts, links to other pages of interest, random talk about theology/philosophy/apologetics/movies/scifi/sports and more!

SDG.